You must log in or register to post. Registration is free! [ Register ]

The Recording Project Forum Index -> Live Gear

FAQ Search Photo Album!
 NEW THREAD!!!!
View previous topic :: View next topic 
Post new topic  Reply to topic
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 12:36 pm    Post subject: NEW THREAD!!!! Reply with quote

I'm playing a gig last night with my daughter. It was a banquet, and we were dressed appropriately...the daughter was actually in a black dress and heels. She's not used to heels, so she took them off before we started playing. Right before I turn the mains up, she touches the mic while holding her guitar and gets shocked. I wasn't getting shocked. We had soundchecked without problems. About the time she started trying to remove some of her jewelry, I noticed she had taken her shoes off. The floor was concrete, no carpet. Of course, after she put her shoes back on, she had no more problems.

...is that normal? I understand that she was grounded in bare feet on concrete, but was there any kind of an electrical problem that contributed to this? She plays barefoot a lot, but usually on wood stages, not concrete. Also, I always run our little PA and lights off of one outlet...outlet >>extension cord >> several power strips. These cords were all on the floor last night about 2 feet in front of us.

I know nothing about electricity, and this forum needs more threads, so I thought I'd ask, lol.

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Trojka Offline
DafDuckling




Age: 43


PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erm...you're not supposed to post in this forum.
_________________
My Flickr Photostream

My album Tijd
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
pipelineaudio Offline
Giant Member


Joined: 02 Nov 2003
Posts: 1672
Age: 46

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what was her guitar plugged into? what was your guitar plugged into?
Polarity on an amplifier's power is pretty important in the road to unzarkia

_________________
REAPER Shirts and Stuff


REAPER Chat - Realtime REAPER Help


REAPER Basics Videos


pipelineaudio.net - Your source for everything in audio engineering
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

her guitar was DI'd...and I mean, totally DI'd, directly from her guitar to the 1/4" input on the board.
_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Timothy Offline






PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has nothing to do with the lack of heels.

Its the ground adapter. You've bypassed the ground somehow and caused periodical electrical shock.

http://www.hammondmfg.com/1580.htm
http://www.guitarnuts.com/technical/electrical/safety/index.php

Seriously, this stuff is a caution Chris. I took a few theatre safety courses and electrical is the biggest problem area. Many, many people get hurt this way and equipment can get ruined.

Dont forget to check connections. Don't be afraid to bust open the XLR output of your mics, check your cables and make sure you're not bypassing the ground with the outlets, your extensions and power bars.

There lies your problem,
Timothy.
Back to top
View user's profile
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timothy wrote:
It has nothing to do with the lack of heels.

but she put shoes on and it stopped. Why was that? The problem never happened during soundcheck (when we were both wearing shoes), and it stopped as soon as she put hers back on. I'm not arguing with you at all, I just can't figure that part out.

And yeah, the reason I posted this thread is b/c I seem to remember that this can do stuff like stop hearts. I have an old old old habit of touching the strings of my guitar to the windscreen of the mic and looking for sparks before ever stepping up to the mic, but I haven't instilled that habit in my daughter yet. A few milliamps can stop a heart if they catch it at the right time.

After I posted this thread, I looked online and found a ground fault circuit interrupter.

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From The "guitarnuts" article.

"The guitarist's equipment is okay, but improper mains wiring places a lethal voltage (referenced to earth ground) on the "ground" side of the jack. This voltage could be either AC or DC, depending on the design of the equipment. This occurs most often when the earth ground of the mains wiring is not connected and the "neutral" and "hot" sides of the outlet are reversed. This scenario is much more common than it should be – it seems far too many club owners have all their wiring and remodeling done by half-wit inlaws. Fortunately, this is also the easiest scenario to detect and prevent. Every gigging musician should have one of the simple three-prong testers that are sold for a few bucks in hardware stores and should use it every time they set up for a gig – even if they've played the venue a thousand times. The shock path is similar to that of scenario one, above. In this case the path through the feet (and the resistance of shoes and floor covering) can be painful but is less likely to be fatal because the voltages are lower than those of scenario one. However, the path through another piece of equipment can still easily be fatal.

That seems like the most likely scenario in my mind, which means it was the club's "fault." But here's my ignorance rearing it's ugly head. Assume that the club's wiring was fine...can a grounded electrical signal get "ungrounded" somewhere in my equipment? Every cord and powerstrip I have has 3 prongs, obviously, but I'd never even considered the ground on the XLR's. Is it the lower center spike?

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Timothy Offline






PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris, I dont get the vibe that you're arguing at all. It's very important for you to have all your proverbial bases covered in keeping yourself and your daughter safe! I think the shoe thing was just a coincidence to be honest. The effects of these grounding scenarios can vary. One moment everything seems to be fine and the next electrical goes awry.

In regards to the grounded electrical signal becoming "ungrounded" - yes it can happen, this is why the cables need to be tested.
We consider the lower center pin/spike as pin number three. The pin above it to the left is pin number one and the pin to the above right of pin number three is pin number two.

This being said pin number one is the ground/shield.

Pin one makes connection first neutralizing electrostatic charges, ground differences and the possibility of connection pops where the connection is already completed in the chain.

Pins two and three are twisted around eachother and pin number one the ground/shield is braided (normally white wire).

Timothy.
Back to top
View user's profile
Lt. Bob Offline
On a Break


Joined: 03 Nov 2003
Posts: 12390
Location: America's Wang
Age: 66


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well with older equipment getting shocked when barefoot was common and you reversed polarity and 'fixed' it. Most new stuff doesn't have a way to reverse polarity ..... wonder if that could be it.
_________________
Of course your take on me, is going to be different than my take on me --- GT
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
tmix Offline
Amazing Member


Joined: 09 Jan 2004
Posts: 706
Location: Mansfield Texas (Dallas /Fort Worth)
Age: 59


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris,
There was not Phantom power going to the mic was there?
Sometimes, dependant on cabling some might shunt to the mic , so when she touched the floor she was grounded. If not the Phantom, then often the ground is broken or missing in outlet at clubs and restaurants. For whatever reason whether intentional or not, the ground is faulty or nonexistant. I bought a simple device from Home Depot that looks like a 3 prong plug that you simply plug into each outlet before you hook in your equipment that tells you whether the ground is missing or whether the hot and neutral legs are backwards. It cost under 10 bucks, well worth the price!

Tom
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tmix wrote:
Chris,
There was not Phantom power going to the mic was there?

that's a great question...the P.P. is just a button on my board - definitely could have gotten engaged during one of our recent moves. And yeah, I know the device you're talking about...will get one before friday.

Thanks guys.

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Treeline Offline
Giant Member


Joined: 03 Nov 2003
Posts: 3116
Location: The smoke filled back room where it all really happens
Age: 61


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The circuit ground tester is a must. Always test an outlet before using it.

Another thing that may be contributing to this problem is the tendency for people to plug everything into the "nearest" outlet - and not to be coordinated with others about it. If there is a problem with the way the outlets, or just one of them, are wired, it can lay undetected for years until you make a ground loop between the two outlets, which your daughter might have done. Her body may have completed a circuit between the concrete, which holds moisture and is a good conductor, and the mic, the outside of which should be grounded but may have been hot due to a bad outlet down cellar somewhere. It may have been fifty or sixty volts and only a milliamp, as the problem might be a single stray wire strand in a junction or outlet box. When she put her shoes back on, the insulation was good enoug to break the circuit and she was OK.

That happened to me once when I had a dozen neighborhood kids in my parent's swimming pool. If you were in the pool and touched a puddle on the pool apron (concrete) you got a jolt. They were all laughing about it when I heard what was happening. All the kids out of the pool and we're playing frizbee and getting ice cream... When I investigated the problem, I learned that my folks had put a new oil pump in the garage the week before. I tore into the new wiring and found a junction box with exactly that scenario - a single strand of wire was shorting from hot to ground. The juice traveled through the garage slab, underneath the lawn to the nearest significant ground - a body of water. When you were in the water and touched the wet pool apron, it was electrified and seeking the best path to ground - and a person is a better conductor than concrete. Low current, high adrenalin.

I have a small enough system so that I can insist on running everything - and I mean everything - through one single outlet. I carry a box with about six hundred feet of heavy extension cords to make that happen. The power enters the stage system at one point only (that outlet having been tested with the five dollar polarity / ground checker), through a line conditioner, and from there everything gets power strips. They are all polarized; the system is quieter and nobody gets hurt.

It's more difficult when you plug into a house system, as you have to trust that the wiring is OK. Most places have pretty funky wiring, but a place that has bands a lot and a house board should have its act together that way.

_________________
Shut up, she explained.

HERE THERE BE MOOSIC
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice post, Treeline. Yeah, I've never understood what a "ground loop" is, but I've played in bands long enough to know that it's best to use the same outlet for everything that you can...until the PA and lights can't be on the same plug, anyway...and we're nowhere near that point yet.

Now, the "line conditioner"...what is that? I have the same extension cord box, by the way, lol. How can you tell if a powerstrip is "polarized?" I mean, mine all have 3 prongs and surge protection, but I have no idea what polarized means, lol.

Also, when the problem first happened, before I noticed her shoes were off, the very first thing I did was to unplug our one cord from the socket it was in and plugged it into a different outlet on the other side of the room. I have no idea if they were on the same circuit or not, but I'm not sure that even matters since we were only using one outlet. It didn't fix the problem. Only shoes "fixed" it, but I'd be lying if I said that I wasn't concerned about it throughout the night, lol.

So biggies for me will be the circuit ground tester, a line conditioner (assuming I figure out what that is), a CGF interrupter, polarized power strips (same assumption, of course) and making sure the freaking "phantom power" button didn't get pressed....

...your swimming pool story is only hilarious because nobody got killed, hehehee.

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Sloop Offline
Ultra Member


Joined: 07 Nov 2003
Posts: 6523
Location: Indiana
Age: 57


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since she only had a problem when barefoot you definitely had a grounding problem. There are so many ways to get potential betweet two ground points you have to be very methodical in hooking up the equipment. Of course it is often the venue having improper wiring.

Power conditioners can go a long way to prevent this situation. Plug everything you have into one, it gets plugged into the power from the venue.
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
skod Offline
Giant Member





PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phantom power will not cause a shock sensation like the one she describes: the voltage is relatively low (48VDC), and the current is limited by series resistors. If you stuck the cable directly on the tip of your tongue, it would be very much akin to licking a 9V battery: unpleasant, but not life-changing. So IMNSHO, don't fear phantom power: it has been pretty well engineered to be as safe as humanly possible. The same can't be said for the power lines.

The way you get a _tingle_ is when the current leakage is AC. The alternating current gives you a most unmistakeable repetitive "eek", and you can't miss it. The board might have been floating with respect to earth ground, so the potential at the mic or guitar shield was different than the potential at the concrete surface. The damned sad thing is that it takes some work to find out where the problem is: the sound gear could be absolutely perfect, and instead the *concrete* could be hot (say, a short between the electical hot line and a piece of rebar embedded in the slab 30 feet away!). Start from first principles, and check the mic and DI lines with a multimeter set for 200VAC, with respect to both the ground at the board and whatever other grounds you can find on the outlet boxes in the neighborhood.

The number of incompetently-wired venues out there just astonishes me. I always do this check going into a room. Churches are often the worst, since they are often wired or modified using less-than-fully-competent volunteer labor... Sign me up as yet another one who agrees with the "check every venue every time" crowd.

The worst I've seen was a club in Boston, now long gone, where the stage was on one leg of 220, and the board was on the other. They'd wired all the outlets totally wrong, with the result that you had a perfect 220V between the guitarists "grounded" strings (that were actually tied to one leg of the 220) and the "grounded" mic case (tied to the other). Kiss the mic and set your soul free. Performers have been killed due to this kind of crap, so a quick meter check is pretty much mandatory....

_________________
Scott Griffith, Scratchpad Studio/Earfull Sound
the Nerd formerly known as Skippy
Back to top
View user's profile
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Skod...I used to work with an attorney named Scott Griffith. You're a lot smarter than he is. Thanks for the help guys.
_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
MikeP Offline
Newbie


Joined: 07 Dec 2004
Posts: 33
Location: Austin TX


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The shoe protected your daughter by insulating her from the current's ground. The shock is probably from a faulty ground, as has been mentioned earlier. Concrete isn't as good a conductor as copper wire, but it will conduct electricity, especially if it's humid and there's some moisture condensed on it. Your daughter's shoes were insulating her from the current passing through the damp concrete. When she was barefoot, the damp concrete and sweaty feet made a great conductor and, hence, she got shocked. Been there, done that, lucky to be alive...

There's a good reason why lots of bands carry rugs with them to put onstage. I've been jolted hard once or twice and it can be life-threatening. I strongly suggest your daughter either get used to playing in her heels or find some nice flats to wear, but don't play barefoot.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Lt. Bob Offline
On a Break


Joined: 03 Nov 2003
Posts: 12390
Location: America's Wang
Age: 66


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One time when I was playing on the road with a band from Takoma Park, Maryland; we were playing in Auburn Ala. at a gay bar named Peeps' Lounge.
I was playing guitar and sax but on about 5 songs I played bass.

So we had just gotten into town and set-up ... and were doing a soundcheck and I was playing bass. It was an Ampeg SVT with two 8-10 bottoms and a red Gibson Thunderbird bass ( I remember this so well which is what you always say about terrible moments in your life Very Happy )
So we started the song and I stepped up to the mic to sing and the very second my lips touched the microphone BAMM!*@^!.
IT WAS LIKE SOMEONE HIT ME IN THE FACE WITH A BAT !!! I saw blue fire and it actually knocked me down off my feet! Shocked I swear, it was as hard as if somebody hit me right in the face with a board........

So I got up ..... and you know how you touch your guitar strings to the mic stand to see if it crackles before you touch it?..... well I walked over (after I got my wits back ) and touched the E string (the BIG damned string ) to the mic stand and the very instant the string touched the stand it was burned in two!!!! POW!! Like a welding machine cut it!
Surprised

Turned out ....... the power switch had got knocked off it's mount and touched the amps casing and I was getting 110v to the bass strings which means I got 110v to my lips when I touched the mic stand.!

Needless to say ..... I'm fairly cautious about the juice nowadays.

Smile

_________________
Of course your take on me, is going to be different than my take on me --- GT
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
pdknkow Offline
Giant Member


Joined: 10 Jun 2004
Posts: 4810
Location: Rochester, NY
Age: 48


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That brings new meanign to "live" gear. Ya think thats were ACDC got it all from?? Wink
_________________
Quote:
Plus there's the added benefit of annoying Zlurgh and wisc... Dafduc (RIP)

Call me 'sweetheart' one more time Nanook, and it's on. - Brad
Back to top
View user's profile
Timothy Offline






PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lt. Bob what an intense story! (not that treeline's wasnt or anything)

I can honestly say i've learned a lot here today just reading over the posts especially from Skod. I'm really glad you started this thread Chris, I think I can learn from example here instead of experience. When I first read this it didn't jump out at me "The floor was concrete, no carpet" I was busy thinking back to things I had learnt in the safety class and trying to fit them to your scenario.

Timothy.
Back to top
View user's profile
ramen Offline
DafDuckling


Joined: 19 Mar 2004
Posts: 13901
Location: Chicago...ish
Age: 37


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow@Lt. Bob.

As a live sound student i had heard such horror stories about guys getting killed from this sort of jolt. Personally, i have only recieved jolts that were annoying at best. One time, when i was playing guitar and got this sensation from the mic, i told the sound guy AND HE PUTS A WINDSCREEN ON IT Rolling Eyes
which worked, until my sweat and spit turned the windscreen into a sponge.

anyways, i am curious as to the best way to check for this. So far i have gotten that i should:

1. buy one of those outlet testers and use them at every show

2. touch the strings of my plugged in guitar to the screen of the microphone

3. Anything else?

Thanks y'all.

_________________
a little misunderstanding? Galileo and the Pope had a little misunderstanding!
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Chris_Harris Offline
Whack-A-Mod




Age: 48

MSN Messenger

PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man, Lt.Bob, heheheee...I was really kinda' hoping you'd have one of those stories...I was looking for it in your first post.

I too have some (hopefully easy) unanswered questions.

1. What is a line/power conditioner?
2. How do you check 1/4" cables and mic cords with a multimeter? What readings would scare you?
3. What is a "polarized" powerstrip?

Then I'll shut up.

_________________
Gear:A Laptop with Reaper, An Acoustic guitar, An Electric Guitar, A Fender Bronco short bass that cost $100 brand new, AT4050, A Firepod, Cords - Both black AND blue, KRK ROKIT 8 monitors, the belief that listing your gear is Silly As Fuck
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Lt. Bob Offline
On a Break


Joined: 03 Nov 2003
Posts: 12390
Location: America's Wang
Age: 66


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think we're talking about "polarized" ...... in this case we're talking about polarity.
You know how one slot of a wall outlet is bigger than the other? And so power cords and extension cords will only go in one way; even without a ground plug?That's polarity. On old amps like my 1970's Ampegs ..... they actually have a polarity switch which does the same thing as unplugging a two-prong cord and turning it over and plugging it back in with the prongs in the opposite slots of the wall outlet.
Theoretically if everything's plugged in with the same polarity you won't have shock problems but that depends on the place being wired properly. I'm not sure why polarity makes a difference but if I flip the switch the wrong way on my Ampegs ..... I get shocked when I touch the mic and the other way I don't.

Line conditioning can mean different things ..... in the simplest form .... it'll just take out spikes of current that pop up in house voltage and can damage gear if extreme. Some of your fancier conditioners will actually reconstruct the juice with a transformer and regulate it so the voltage will stay constant. You'd be surprised how much the voltage in wall outlets can vary. With a sophisticated line conditioner it isolates you from the wall current because what you're getting is actually 'regenerated' in the transformer. Obviosly this would help stop shocks since you're not actually using the juice out of the wall.
Don't think the cheaper 'conditioners' would help a lot with shocks but someone might tell me I'm wrong and why.

_________________
Of course your take on me, is going to be different than my take on me --- GT
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
skod Offline
Giant Member





PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best thing of all is a conditioner or power strip that has health indicator lights, just like your outlet checker. Plug it into a miswired outlet, and it lights up like a Christmas tree, and tells you what is wrong: floating ground, hot and neutral reversed, whatever. Furman has a bunch of conditioners that do that, but even cheaper are the APC power strip/surge filters that do it. Both of those are good investments, since they watch your back even when you are in too much of a hurry/are too distracted to do the checks yourself.

There's a downside to checking grounds with the strings before you check with a meter: if you really do have a hot-on-ground scenario, you can easily melt down the guts of your axe _but good_. Our good buddy Lt. Bob got away with one there: at the least, it should have taken out the ground wire from signal ground to his bridge, and at worst it could have simply slagged down all the onboard pots. Use a meter (or at least a neon-lamp ohshit detector!) first. Do this with a Les Paul Recording, and the guts of the instrument will have bought the farm toot sweet!

Older amps do have a polarity switch, and what that does is allow you to choose which side of the input power line you define as "hot". With a transformer power supply, it probably seems as if this shouldn't matter, and it usually doesn't. However, the windings in the transformer exhibit some parasitic capacitance that couples the primary to the secondary: and AC runs through a capacitor like shit through a goose. So, the switch really lets you decide which side of the line you want to tie to your chassis ground with an even bigger capacitor to dump the goose-shit off to the electrical neutral and to the safety ground, instead of to your lips... Try to dump it to the hot, and your lips get burned, because that lets even _more_ shit through the goose. Dump it to the neutral, and all is copacetic, IF and only if the venue's wiring is good...

This is a lame-ass solution to a serious problem- but it is better than nothing. With my old band, I set up a power harness that we used at every venue, so that all the backline amps would always be on the same circuit with the same ground, and I could optionally tie that ground to the board's ground if I needed to to prevent the inadvertent creation of lip omelettes...

_________________
Scott Griffith, Scratchpad Studio/Earfull Sound
the Nerd formerly known as Skippy
Back to top
View user's profile
Treeline Offline
Giant Member


Joined: 03 Nov 2003
Posts: 3116
Location: The smoke filled back room where it all really happens
Age: 61


PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2005 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's what I use as a line conditioner - the mid sized one. It's a pain as the thing weighs 165 pounds... It's going to end up as a studio piece once I get something a bit more portable. 1.4 kVA / 1,000 watts, deep cycle marine battery, all that jazz. I bought it used; it had been protecting a mainframe.

 

pw_ferrups.jpg


_________________
Shut up, she explained.

HERE THERE BE MOOSIC
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:    View previous topic :: View next topic 
Quick Reply      
Use this form to post a quick reply without having to go through the normal reply process.    
     
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Recording Project Forum Index -> Live Gear All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Jump to:  


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum